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Valuing Adults with Learning Disabilities

04 Nov

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Last month I was social reporting at eSAY’s 6th Birthday Party. The event took place to share the latest statistics from the Scottish Consortium of Learning Disabilities (SCLD) on adults with learning disabilities in Scotland.

I wanted to share some of the content from the day because working at this event changed my thinking – I realised I’d underestimated the contribution adults with learning disabilities can and do make to our society. But first I’ll explain what social reporting is…

Social Reporting

Social reporting is about capturing an event from the inside using audio, video and photos. I’ll give you an example. During the first talk of the day (Professor Gyles Glover on research in England) Clare Mills tweeted a picture of her notes, expertly drawn on her Ipad:

I was impressed by her use of graphics and I found Clare during the first break. I said it would be great to share what she was doing with a wider audience and asked if she would mind doing a quick interview. We talked about what she does a bit first and then I used my phone to take a picture of Clare with her Ipad (note the balloons, I wanted to show context was a party):

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and I used the soundcloud app to record a live audio interview with her about what she was doing:

Listen to the audio on Soundcloud here

This was then shared online in real time so people following the conference could see Clare’s notes and then hear from the artist herself about what she was doing and how this was relevant to bigger debate about sharing statistics with adults with learning disabilities. So social reporting is about connecting something personal, relevant and specific to the bigger picture. It’s all about people and stories.

Why People Matter

Here’s one of the video interviews captured by social reporter Cath McKay at SCLD. She interviewed Sandy Galbraith, an adult with learning disabilities who works for SCLD. One of the things I like about this video is Sandy talking about his experience of interviewing adults with learning disabilities. He’d written certain types of people off as not having a meaningful contribution but he was surprised by what people did offer when he gave them a chance to have their say. I think we’ve all been guilty of that! I must confess I was impressed by Sandy’s answers to questions in this video – I may have written him off because of his disability – I realise now I was wrong and I felt comforted to see this error echoed and corrected in Sandy’s own confession “it just goes to show you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover”:

Why People Matter #esaystats from SCLD on Vimeo.

Valuing Adults with Learning Disabilities

My favourite interview of the day was with Sandra, Joanne and Colin from the ASSET project at Falkirk Council. This amazing story demonstrates it’s possible to successfully integrate adults with learning disabilities into a workplace. Sandra points out that Joanna and Colin are working unsupervised – they are a genuine help not a hinderance. These adults are working independently but sadly they are only paid £2 a day:

Valuing Adults with Learning Disabilities #esaystats from SCLD on Vimeo.

I should maybe say before I filmed this I spoke to Sandra, Joanna an Colin and asked each of them what they would like to talk about. They were not forced or pressurised into saying anything. Sandra was grateful they’d been listened to and treated with respect.

The great thing about being at an event like this is I got to share stories that really matter. I agree with Sandra, we should value the contribution Joanna and Colin make with more money. I’d be interested to hear what you think?

Personally this event has changed me. I admit I was wrong and judged others wrongly. It’s good when you realise what an idiot you’ve been sometimes! Thanks to people like Sandy, Colin and Joanne I’m now different.

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You can watch the rest of the video interviews from eSAY’s 6th birthday party on the SCLD vimeo channel and listen to audio interviews on the SCLD Soundcloud channel. Find all the statistics shared at the event here.

I work as a social reporter for Third Sector Lab and we were working for the Scottish Consortium for Learning DisabilitiesImage Credit (top photo): Clare Mills

 
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Posted by on November 4, 2013 in Education, Events, Film, Media, storytelling

 

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